The Adhering National Body of Germany (FRG) is the National Committee for Permafrost which was established in 1984. The chairman is Professor Jessberger, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Bochum, with Professor Liedtke (vice-chairman), Department of Geography, University of Bochum, Dr. Burchkhardt, Geological Survey of Northrhine-Westphalia and Professor Thyssen, Department of Geophysics, University of Minster, being the other members of the National Committee. At present, the National Committee is under the auspices of and supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), the central non-governmental institution for the promotion of sciences in West Germany. About 200 scientists have declared an interest in various aspects of permafrost or permafrost related research, half of which are earth scientists and the remainder engineering scientists. Recently, industry (e.g. steel industry) has indicated support of the National Committee's interests. The Committee may be enlarged by representatives for bio-sciences and planetology, if necessary. The aim of the National Committee is to represent German permafrost research within IPA and to support and coordinate permafrost research in Germany. Matters of the National committee have been discussed on several occasions, e .g. on Meetings of the German Society for Polar Research, the German Association for Quaternary Research, the National Committee of SCAR and the DFG-Senate's Commission for Geosciences. Discussions are still going on as to whether the National Committee should actively affiliate with or become a body of one of the existing scientific societies.

Although present permafrost does not occur in Germany there is a long tradition of permafrost related research within geomorphology, Quaternary geology, polar research and within the field of artificial ground freezing. Most of the regional Quaternary geomorphology of Germany touches problems of the reconstruction of former permafrost conditions. Studies on the geomorphology of present permafrost are carried out in the Antarctic, Iceland, Greenland and various high alpine environments (Alps, Scandinavia, Andes, Himalayas, Tibet). Within geophysics the main interest is in the effects of permafrost on seismic studies. Within civil engineering in Germany a large number of studies are devoted to thermal engineering design, frost heave and ice segregation, mechanics of frozen soil as well as to excavations, mining and municipal facilities.

Report by J. Karte.